Tomato 'F1 Shirley' Seeds


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There's nothing nicer than a sun-warmed tomato, freshly picked from your own back garden. Tomato ‘F1 Shirley’ is hard to beat. This early maturing tomato has been very popular for home cultivation since the 1970's and has rapidly established itself as the nation's favourite. Tomato 'F1 Shirley' is one of the best varieties suitable for cold or slightly heated glasshouses. It is indoor cordon type and the fruits are grown on short joints. The robust plants crop early and heavily over a long period of time and regularly produce more than 6kg (13lb) of fruits. Resistant to Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Cladosporium fuluum race A,B,C,D and E and Fusarium oxysporum race 1 & 2.

Highly recommended and easy to grow, Tomato 'F1 Shirley' produces excellent quality, medium sized red fruits with a firm skin and a lovely taste and texture.

 

Pretty Wild Seeds are registered with the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) under number 7529, so you can have confidence in both our products and advice. Although our products are listed in weights and acres, we can supply in additional quantities upon enquiry so if you need a larger supply, please don't hesitate to give us a call.

  • 10 seeds for £2.10
  • 25 seeds for £3.50
  • 50 seeds for £5.79
  • 100 seeds for £9.99
  • Quantities from: £2.10




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    The Tomato 'F1 Shirley' Seeds is shown in Fruit Herb and Vegetable Seeds > Fruits , Fruit Herb and Vegetable Seeds > Tomato Seeds.

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    We happily accept returns within 14 days from date of delivery. All returns must be received in the same condition and packaging we sent them. Postage charges will not be refunded on unwanted products.

    You are solely responsible for ensuring the goods are returned to us. We will not be liable for returns that are lost in the post or lost for any other reason. If a product arrives damaged we will advise the customer how to return the item with all return costs covered by us.  Replacements & refunds will be dispatched / issued on receipt of the returned items only.

    Sowing; Sow the tomato seed individually in cell trays, using a good quality seed compost. Lightly cover over and keep moist at a temperature of 18 degrees. Seedlings should start showing around 7 days if you have the right temperature.

    Prick out into 9cm pots once the seedlings are big enough. When the plants have reached 2 trues leaves, begin feeding weekly with a weak tomato feed.

    Growing On; Once the plants are 20cm tall, they can be planted in their final positions. Because tomatoes like the warmth you will always get a earlier and bigger crop from greenhouse grown plants.

    Greenhouse grown plants can be planted April onwards. Plants for outside should be hardened off, before planting out. Plant under cloches in early May, otherwise leave till June and plant out then. Again this will all depend on weather and risk of frost!

    Carry on feeding weekly. Increase the strenght of the feed as the plant grows. We believe lack of feed is the main reason that people fail in growing a decent crop of tomatoes. The feed should include a balance of Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus (NPK) and ideally should include Trace Elements as well.

    Being a cordon variety Tomato Shirley will need support as it grows. String can be used, tied firmly to a strong support wire above and tied loosely around the base of the plant. The plants are then twisted round the string as they grow. The direction of twisting doesn’t matter, but be consistent; otherwise you will untwist the ones you did earlier! Canes can be used, but be careful that heavily loaded plants may slide down unless tied securely. At the same time make sure you don’t strangle the plant stems.

    Other Tasks; Sideshoots should be removed regularly before they get large. It should be possible to do this by hand but if they get too big a knife or secateurs should be used. Some leaves may need to be removed if very congested and old leaves should be removed from the bottom of the plant as they begin to age. They should snap out like sideshoots. Doing this will also allow easier picking off ripen fruits and reduce disease risk.