Petunia Avalanche F1 Mixed Pelleted Seeds


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This is a unique group of overhanging hybrid petunias. When cultivated correctly, eight colour shades create a true “avalanche” of large flowers in bright and pastel colours. Flowers can reach 7–9 cm in diameter. Young plants are erect at first. Only after having grown, does their own weight make them fall and spread further in cascades. It is important to replant them correctly and to keep the plants growing continuously.

Very impressive in balcony flower boxes, large hanging baskets and bowls etc. The ideal location is in a sunny area. They need regular watering and fertilisation during the whole vegetation period.

 

Pretty Wild Seeds are registered with the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) under number 7529, so you can have confidence in both our products and advice.

  • 20 Seeds for £2.99
  • 40 Seeds for £4.99
  • 100 Seeds for £6.99
  • Quantities from: £2.99




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    The Petunia Avalanche F1 Mixed Pelleted Seeds is shown in Flower Seeds > Annuals Seed.

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    We happily accept returns within 14 days from date of delivery. All returns must be received in the same condition and packaging we sent them. Postage charges will not be refunded on unwanted products.

    You are solely responsible for ensuring the goods are returned to us. We will not be liable for returns that are lost in the post or lost for any other reason. If a product arrives damaged we will advise the customer how to return the item with all return costs covered by us.  Replacements & refunds will be dispatched / issued on receipt of the returned items only.

    If you want the earliest summer colour and nice sized, bushy petunia plants to place in the garden after the last frosts in May/June, it’s a good idea to sow petunia seeds 12 weeks ahead of your expected last frost. The first week of June is a safe bet for planting in most of the UK, therefore petunia seeds are best sown in March. Peat-based composts are still the best option for sowing petunia seeds.

    The temperature for germination should be between 18-24C (64-75F)  at seed level and this can usually be provided in a heated propagator, if this is not available, seal sowing trays in a clear polythene bag in a warm room of the house. A room which becomes cool at night should not be chosen.

    It is important to sow thinly and not to cover the seed, even a thin covering of compost can severely reduce germination. The lack of a compost covering necessitates very careful monitoring of the moisture in the compost, for if the surface of the compost dries out the young seedlings will quickly die. This is best achieved by covering the seed pots with polythene or glass and a sheet of newspaper to reflect strong light, so the surface of the compost does not heat up too much, but some light still penetrates.

    Transplant seedlings once they have produced two true leaves. After potting on the temperature is important. Temperatures below 10C (50F) discourage growth of the main central shoot and encourage the development of side shoots from low down on the plant. Unfortunately this also delays the appearance of the first flowers. At temperatures above 15C (59F) basal branching is restricted, the main stem grows more quickly and flowering is hastened. By sowing in early spring and keeping the temperature cool after pricking out, well branched plants should be produced which will flower more effectively when planted out in the garden.

    When the rosettes of foliage cover the compost the trays can be moved from the greenhouse to frames and grown cool. As long as the plants are frost free they are happy. Although they are not as hardy as their relatives the nicotianas, they are tougher than many people think. They can be planted out as soon as the last frost has passed.